Early Childhood Education Journal

, Volume 39, Issue 6, pp 391–395 | Cite as

Break for Physical Activity: Incorporating Classroom-Based Physical Activity Breaks into Preschools

  • Danielle D. Wadsworth
  • Leah E. Robinson
  • Karen Beckham
  • Kip Webster
Article

Abstract

Engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity is essential to lifelong health and wellness. Physical activity behaviors established in early childhood relate to physical activity behaviors in later years. However, research has shown that children are adopting more sedentary behaviors. Incorporating structured and planned physical activity breaks into classroom transition times is an inexpensive and effective technique to increase children’s physical activity during school hours. However, this approach has not been studied in preschool settings. The purpose of this paper is to provide a simple, cost-effective method that incorporates structured physical activity into the preschool curriculum through classroom based physical activity breaks. Results of a case study along with an overview of the implementation of physical activity breaks are discussed.

Keywords

Fitness breaks School-day physical activity Accelerometers Preschoolers 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank the early learning center, classroom teachers, and children for all of their time and energy. This study was presented at the 2010 Society of Behavioral Medicine Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Danielle D. Wadsworth
    • 1
  • Leah E. Robinson
    • 1
  • Karen Beckham
    • 1
  • Kip Webster
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of KinesiologyAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA

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