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Basic Concepts in Early Childhood Educational Standards: A 50-State Review

Abstract

The incidence of basic concepts in early childhood educational standards is explored across all 50 US states. Concept inclusion in state standards is described in terms of the representation of the universe of basic concepts, representation of concept categories, the depth and breadth of individual concept inclusion, and unique examples. Developmental basic concept acquisition and instructional sequence is illustrated for each of eleven conceptual categories to highlight the systematic nature in which concept instruction should proceed. A state by state examination of the extent to which more than 300 basic language concepts are embedded in early childhood state standards is made, with examples from a variety of states cited for each category. Conclusions are made about the need for comprehensive and systematic inclusion of the universe of basic concepts in early childhood education to ensure that all children have the basic descriptive language needed to describe the world around them and comprehend and discuss subject matter in all content areas.

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Correspondence to Bruce A. Bracken.

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Bracken, B.A., Crawford, E. Basic Concepts in Early Childhood Educational Standards: A 50-State Review. Early Childhood Educ J 37, 421–430 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-009-0363-7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-009-0363-7

Keywords

  • Basic concepts
  • State standards
  • Early childhood education
  • Language development