Exposure to Media Violence and Young Children with and Without Disabilities: Powerful Opportunities for Family-Professional Partnerships

Abstract

There is growing concern regarding the amount and type of violence that young children are exposed to on a daily basis. Through media, popular toys and video games violent images are consistently present in children’s lives starting at a very young age. This paper discusses (a) the growing presence of young children’s exposure to media violence, (b) the influence of media violence on early childhood development and well-being, (c) the impact of media violence on young children with disabilities, and (d) recommendations for addressing this national dilemma within the context of family-professional partnerships. A list of related web resources is also included.

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Correspondence to Elizabeth J. Erwin.

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Erwin, E.J., Morton, N. Exposure to Media Violence and Young Children with and Without Disabilities: Powerful Opportunities for Family-Professional Partnerships. Early Childhood Educ J 36, 105 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-008-0276-x

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Keywords

  • Media violence
  • Young children with disabilities
  • Family-professional partnerships
  • Early childhood
  • Television and screen activities