When Fewer Is More: Small Groups in Early Childhood Classrooms

Abstract

Small group instruction is important yet it is one of the most underused strategies in early childhood classrooms. This paper presents guidelines based on research-based best practices for using small groups in early childhood. In addition, the benefits of small group instruction for both children and teachers are described. Specific suggestions for managing small groups in classrooms are presented.

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Correspondence to Barbara Wasik.

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Wasik, B. When Fewer Is More: Small Groups in Early Childhood Classrooms. Early Childhood Educ J 35, 515–521 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-008-0245-4

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Keywords

  • Small groups
  • Preschool instruction