Empowering the Parent–Child Relationship in Homeless and Other High-risk Parents and Families

Abstract

High quality parent–child relations are essential to healthy development and learning in children. Homeless families experience many barriers to realizing the needed bonding and nurturance for having healthy relationships. This article explores the obstacles to the development of nurturing parent–child relations and offers strategies for addressing these issues.

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Correspondence to Kevin J. Swick.

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Swick, K.J. Empowering the Parent–Child Relationship in Homeless and Other High-risk Parents and Families. Early Childhood Educ J 36, 149–153 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-007-0228-x

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Keywords

  • Homeless parents and children
  • Empower homeless parents
  • Parent–child relations
  • Nurturing relations in homeless families