Early Childhood Education Journal

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 187–193 | Cite as

Teachers’ Beliefs about Parent and Family Involvement: Rethinking our Family Involvement Paradigm

Article

This article seeks to provide insights into the role of teacher beliefs about parent and family involvement in supporting or inhibiting parent and family participation in partnerships related to the well being of child and family. The authors aim to offer positive beliefs and strategies for developing nurturing relations between families and schools.

Keywords

parent involvement family involvement teacher beliefs family participation partnership child and family well being nurturing relationships with families 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Instruction and Teacher EducationUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Instruction and Teacher EducationUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

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