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Opening Doors: Understanding School and Family Influences on Family Involvement

  • Erin Carlisle
  • Lindsey Stanley
  • Kristen Mary KempleEmail author
Article

Family involvement in schooling can benefit young children, teachers, and families. Family involvement in schools can be influenced by both school-related and family-related factors. School-related factors include teachers’ attitudes toward families, and school and teacher expectations. Family-related factors include ethnicity, prior school experiences, and family work schedules. Teachers who recognize and understand these influences can employ a variety of strategies to facilitate the involvement of families in the school experience of young children.

Keywords

Family involvement parent participation home–school relationships 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erin Carlisle
    • 1
  • Lindsey Stanley
    • 1
  • Kristen Mary Kemple
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Teaching and LearningUniversity of FloridaGainesville 
  2. 2.School of Teaching and LearningUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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