Environmental and Resource Economics

, Volume 57, Issue 2, pp 233–249 | Cite as

Economic Assessment of the Recreational Value of Ecosystems: Methodological Development and National and Local Application

  • Antara Sen
  • Amii R. Harwood
  • Ian J. Bateman
  • Paul Munday
  • Andrew Crowe
  • Luke Brander
  • Jibonayan Raychaudhuri
  • Andrew A. Lovett
  • Jo Foden
  • Allan Provins
Article

Abstract

We present a novel methodology for spatially sensitive prediction of outdoor recreation visits and values for different ecosystems. Data on outset and destination characteristics and locations are combined with survey information from over 40,000 households to yield a trip generation function (TGF) predicting visit numbers. A new meta-analysis (MA) of relevant literature is used to predict site specific per-visit values. Combining the TGF and MA models permits spatially explicit estimation of visit numbers and values under present and potential future land use. Applications to the various land use scenarios of the UK National Ecosystem Assessment, as well as to a single site, are presented.

Keywords

Recreation Recreational value Ecosystem services  UK National Ecosystem Assessment Meta-analysis Spatially sensitive 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antara Sen
    • 1
  • Amii R. Harwood
    • 1
  • Ian J. Bateman
    • 1
  • Paul Munday
    • 1
  • Andrew Crowe
    • 2
  • Luke Brander
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jibonayan Raychaudhuri
    • 5
  • Andrew A. Lovett
    • 1
  • Jo Foden
    • 6
  • Allan Provins
    • 7
  1. 1.Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE), School of Environmental SciencesUniversity of East Anglia (UEA)NorwichUK
  2. 2.The Food and Environment Research AgencySand Hutton, YorkUK
  3. 3.Division of EnvironmentThe Hong Kong University of Science and TechnologyKowloonHong Kong
  4. 4.Institute for Environmental StudiesVU UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  5. 5.School of EconomicsUniversity of East AngliaNorwichUK
  6. 6.Environment and Ecosystems, Centre for EnvironmentFisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas)Lowestoft, SuffolkUK
  7. 7.Economics for the Environment Consultancy (Eftec)LondonUK

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