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Improving students’ learning performance through Technology-Enhanced Embodied Learning: A four-year investigation in classrooms

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Abstract

Embodied Learning (EL) technologies are now used in educational research as an emerging technology that has the potential to influence the function of the brain to drive learning, especially by integrating the physical body into the learning process. This research examines EL in different learning contexts and circumstances to see how it can improve the overall performance of students in real classroom settings. The study consists of four sequential phases that use data collection and analysis to explore the impact of EL on actual classroom practice. A total of 211 elementary students (n = 211) and 21 primary teachers (n = 21) participated in the study. Applying a multiphase mixed-methods approach, the study focuses on investigating how EL impacts student performance in real learning environments within different elementary classrooms, including Special Education (SE) and General Education (GE) contexts. Results reveal significant gains in students’ cognitive performance, motor skills, and academic performance in language. Results also show improvements in students’ emotional state, resulting in increased students’ motivation to participate in the learning process. Overall, this four-year investigation provides a comprehensive understanding of how EL approaches can be integrated into real classrooms, allowing researchers and teachers to enrich their existing practices, taking into account the benefits of including the movement in their teaching and research.

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Data availability

The datasets generated during and/or analysed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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Acknowledgements

This research was conducted at the Cyprus Interaction Lab of the Cyprus University of Technology (https://www.cyprusinteractionlab.com/). Completing this research study would not have been possible without the help of teachers and students from many schools in Cyprus. I would like to thank all who voluntarily participated in this study, especially the teachers, for their active involvement and collaboration, and the children for their hard work and engagement.

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Correspondence to Panagiotis Kosmas.

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The study was approved by the Ministry of Education and the Centre of Evaluation and Research in Cyprus. The study was performed in accordance with the ethical standards as laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Kosmas, P., Zaphiris, P. Improving students’ learning performance through Technology-Enhanced Embodied Learning: A four-year investigation in classrooms. Educ Inf Technol 28, 11051–11074 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-022-11466-x

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