A systematic review of the use of gamification in flipped learning

Abstract

Flipped learning is considered an increasingly common strategy along with some drawbacks. Gamification has the significant potential to deal with the drawbacks. This study presents a systematic literature review on the use of gamification in flipped learning research. To demonstrate its effectiveness clearly, the only empirical research was covered related to this topic. The Web of Science, Scopus, Wiley Online Library, ERIC and Science Direct databases were surveyed and a total of twenty two articles were selected for the review. The findings reveal that adding game elements into a flipped classroom yields higher motivation, participation and better learning performance. Yet there is insufficient evidence to generalize the results. It is also found that the platforms, Moodle and Kahoot, are the most preferred platforms and points, badges and leaderboards are the most used game elements for gamification.

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Ekici, M. A systematic review of the use of gamification in flipped learning. Educ Inf Technol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-020-10394-y

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Keywords

  • Flipped learning
  • Flipped classroom
  • Gamification
  • Gamified learning