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Blended learning model on hands-on approach for in-service secondary school teachers: Combination of E-learning and face-to-face discussion

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a blended learning model on hands-on approach for in-service secondary school teachers using a quasi-experimental design. A 24-h teacher-training course using the blended learning model was administered to 117 teachers, while face-to-face instruction was given to 60 teachers. The following dependent variables were compared: degree of leaners’ knowledge, self-efficacy and satisfaction with the training course. The results indicated that the experimental, blended learning group showed a significantly higher level of knowledge of hands-on approach and overall satisfaction with the course. However, the self-efficacy and others items related to learner’s learning satisfaction were similar between two groups. Moreover, the findings indicated that access, flexibility, cost effectiveness, improving interaction, formation of teacher network and involving of administrators, instructors and school leaders were factors which contributed to the success of blended learning model. Further implications and suggestions for the blended learning model are presented.

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thanks the MOET, DSE, DOETs, HNUE, HCE, VVOB, and JAIST for financially supporting and collaborating in this study.

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Correspondence to Vinh-Thang Ho.

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Ho, VT., Nakamori, Y., Ho, TB. et al. Blended learning model on hands-on approach for in-service secondary school teachers: Combination of E-learning and face-to-face discussion. Educ Inf Technol 21, 185–208 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-014-9315-y

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Keyword

  • Teacher professional development
  • Blended learning
  • Teacher training course
  • Hands-on approach
  • Secondary school teacher