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Foveation dynamics in congenital nystagmus IV: vergence

  • Louis F. Dell’OssoEmail author
  • Johannes Van Der Steen
  • Robert M. Steinman
  • Han Collewijn
Original Research Article
  • 14 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate foveation dynamics and characteristics of vergence eye movements during fixation of static targets at different distances and while tracking a target moving in depth in a subject with congenital nystagmus (CN).

Method

Eye movements of a well-studied subject with CN were recorded using the magnetic search coil technique and analyzed using the OMtools software, including the eXpanded Nystagmus Acuity Function (NAFX).

Results

Both the phase planes and NAFX values during fixation of targets at various near distances were equivalent to those during fixation of a far target. When applied to vergence data, the NAFX values (“binocular” NAFX) were higher than for the individual eye data. Vergence tracking of targets moving in depth was demonstrated and was accurate for targets moving at speeds up to ~ 35°/sec.

Conclusions

Target foveation qualities during fixation of targets at various near distances were equivalent to that during fixation of a far target. Stereo discrimination was limited by the foveation quality of the eye with the higher NAFX waveform. Foveation period slopes during vergence tracking demonstrated vergence movements despite the ongoing CN oscillation. Similar to what we found with fixation, pursuit, and the vestibulo-ocular systems, these findings establish that vergence in both static and dynamic viewing conditions functions normally in the presence of the CN oscillation.

Keywords

Congenital nystagmus Infantile nystagmus syndrome Vergence Tracking 

Glossary

General terms

CN

Congenital nystagmus

INS

Infantile nystagmus syndrome

IPD

Interpupillary distance

NAFX

Expanded nystagmus acuity function

CN waveforms

JRef

Jerk right with extended foveation

PPfs

Pseudo-pendular with foveating saccades

Calculated terms

LEH

Left eye horizontal

LEH_err

Left eye horizontal error

REH

Right eye horizontal

REH_err

Right eye horizontal error

TDIST

Target distance

TDIST_vel

Target distance velocity

TVRG

Target vergence

TVRG_vel

Target vergence velocity

VRG

Vergence

VRG_err

Vergence error

VRG_vel

Vergence velocity

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the Office of Research and Development, Medical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Statement of human rights

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were approved by the appropriate institutional committee and were in accordance with the ethical standards of the University of Maryland and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Statement on the welfare of animals

This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from the individual participant included in the study.

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Copyright information

© This is a U.S. Government work and not under copyright protection in the US; foreign copyright protection may apply 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Daroff-Dell’Osso Ocular Motility Laboratory, Louis Stokes Cleveland, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, CASE Medical SchoolCase Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical CenterClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Departments of NeurologyCase Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical CenterClevelandUSA
  3. 3.Departments of Biomedical EngineeringCase Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical CenterClevelandUSA
  4. 4.Department of NeuroscienceErasmusMCRotterdamThe Netherlands
  5. 5.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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