Skip to main content

Commentary: Thaddeus Blanchette and Ana Paula da Silva’s Myth of Maria

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Notes

  1. The anti-prostitution pledge requires recipients of US development aid to sign a pledge stating that they have an explicit policy opposing sex work and that they do not promote the activity or advocate for its legalization or decriminalization, but rather its abolition (for more on this see Ford, Lyons and van Schendel 2012; Sandy 2012).

References

  • Busza, J. 2004. Sex work and migration: The dangers of oversimplification—A case study of Vietnamese women in Cambodia. Health and Human Rights 7(2): 231–249.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Chapkis, W. 2005. Soft glove, punishing fist: The trafficking victims protection act of 2000. In Regulating sex: The politics of intimacy and identity, ed. E. Bernstein, and L. Schaffner, 51–66. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Derks, A., R. Henke, and V. Ly. 2006. Review of a decade of research on trafficking in persons, Cambodia. Phnom Penh: Centre for Advanced Study.

    Google Scholar 

  • Doezema, J. 2001. Ouch! Western feminists ‘wounded attachment’ to the ‘Third World Prostitute’. Feminist Review 67(Spring): 16–38.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Entwistle, P. 2001. Sexwork, the family and society: Structural factors inhibiting HIV interventions for sex workers in urban Cambodia. Unpublished PhD thesis, La Trobe University.

  • Ford, M., L. Lyons, and W. van Schendel (eds). 2012. Labour migration and human trafficking. In Labour Migration and Human Trafficking in Southeast Asia: Critical Perspectives, 1–22. London: Routledge.

  • Gallagher, A. 2001. Human rights and the new UN protocols on trafficking and migrant smuggling: A preliminary analysis. Human Rights Quarterly 23(4): 975–1004.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kapur, R. 2005. Cross-border movements and the law: Renegotiating the boundaries of difference. In Trafficking and prostitution reconsidered: New perspectives on migration, sex work and human rights, ed. K. Kempadoo, 25–41. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kempadoo, K. 1998. Introduction: Globalizing sex workers’ rights. In Global sex workers: Rights, resistance, and redefinition, ed. K. Kempadoo, and J. Doezema, 1–28. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Molland, S. 2008. The Perfect Business? Traffickers, Victims and Anti-traffickers along the Mekong. Unpublished PhD thesis, Macquarie University.

  • Murray, A. 1998. Debt-bondage and trafficking: Don’t believe the hype. In Global sex workers: Rights, resistance, and redefinition, ed. K. Kempadoo, and J. Doezema, 51–64. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Piper, N. 2005. A problem by a different name? A review of research on trafficking in Southeast Asia and Oceania. International Migration 43(1–2): 203–233.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sandy, L. 2012. International politics, anti-trafficking measures and sex work in Cambodia. In Labour migration and human trafficking in Southeast Asia: Critical perspectives, ed. M. Ford, L. Lyons, and W. van Schendel, 41–56. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sandy, L. 2007. Just choices: Representations of choice and coercion in sex work in Cambodia. The Australian Journal of Anthropology 18(2): 194–206.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Scarlet Alliance. 2011. Submission on Labour Trafficking, March. Available at: www.scarletalliance.org.au/library/subagd_2011a Accessed 28 December 2012.

  • Vance, C. 2011. Thinking trafficking: Thinking sex. GLQ: A Journal of Gay and Lesbian Studies 17(1): 135–143.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Wijers, M. 1998. Women, labour and migration: The position of trafficked women and strategies for support. In Global sex workers: Rights, resistance, and redefinition, ed. K. Kempadoo, and J. Doezema, 69–78. New York: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) 1995. The Trafficking and Prostitution of Children in Cambodia: A situation report. Regional Workshop on Trafficking in Children for Sexual Purposes, 12-15 December, Phnom Penh.

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Larissa Sandy.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Sandy, L. Commentary: Thaddeus Blanchette and Ana Paula da Silva’s Myth of Maria. Dialect Anthropol 37, 325–331 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10624-013-9312-3

Download citation

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10624-013-9312-3