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Fig. 1 | Digestive Diseases and Sciences

Fig. 1

From: Back to the Source: Molecular Identification of Methanogenic Archaea as Markers of Colonic Methane Production

Fig. 1

Overview of the hot spots for methanogens and methane production in the human body (upper panel) and the four assays devised by Drs. Teigen, Mathai, and associates for colonic methanogens [10] (bottom panel). Methanogens are often detected in nasal, oral, and in the small and large intestinal sites, all of which in theory contribute to breath methane through the systemic circulation and respiration. Therefore, elevated breath methane could be due to overgrowth of methanogens at one or multiple of the four spots. Currently, quantitative contribution to breath methane from each of the four spots remains elusive. Although elevated breath methane has been linked to several diseases, its quantity varies substantially among healthy adults, compromising the utility of breath methane test for disease diagnosis. Teigen et al. developed molecular assays (16S relative abundance and targeted and untargeted mcrA qPCRs) for methanogens that were sensitive (33% to 100% positive rate) enough to discriminate between positive (30%) and negative methane productions measured by an in vitro fecal methane producing assay

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