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Cytotechnology

, Volume 63, Issue 3, pp 307–317 | Cite as

Orally administered Bifidobacterium triggers immune responses following capture by CD11c+ cells in Peyer’s patches and cecal patches

  • Yasuhiro Hiramatsu
  • Akira HosonoEmail author
  • Takuma Konno
  • Yusuke Nakanishi
  • Masamichi Muto
  • Akari Suyama
  • Satoshi Hachimura
  • Ryuichiro Sato
  • Kyoko Takahashi
  • Shuichi Kaminogawa
Original Research

Abstract

We have investigated the immunomodulatory mechanisms of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum JCM7041 (Bp) as model of probiotics following oral administration to mice. This study was conducted with the aim of clarifying the mechanism of immunomodulation induced by oral administration of probiotic bacteria through elucidation of the detailed mechanism of transfer of orally administered bacterial cells within the body and the interaction between bacterial cells and cells of the immune tissues. We observed the localization of Bp in mice following oral administration, showing that Bp was surrounded by CD11c+ cells in Peyer’s patches (PP) and cecal patches (CP). These results indicated that Bp might induce CD11c+ cell-mediated immune responses directly. Furthermore, IL-10 and IL-12p40 production by Thy1.2 cells, including CD11c+ cells, increased significantly. Production of IL-10 and IL-12p40 by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) was significantly increased by Bp stimulation. These results suggest that oral administration of Bp induces immune responses directly following capture by CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs). Subsequently, we observed oral administration of Bp for 1 week induced IgA and IgA-associated cytokine production by CP and PP cells, suggesting that Bp induced DC-mediated immune responses on CP as well as PP.

Keywords

Probiotics Bifidobacterium Dendritic cells 

Abbreviations

Bp

Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum JCM7041

BMDC

Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells

BIM

Bifidobacterium immunomodulator

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasuhiro Hiramatsu
    • 1
  • Akira Hosono
    • 1
    Email author
  • Takuma Konno
    • 1
  • Yusuke Nakanishi
    • 1
  • Masamichi Muto
    • 2
  • Akari Suyama
    • 2
  • Satoshi Hachimura
    • 3
  • Ryuichiro Sato
    • 2
  • Kyoko Takahashi
    • 1
  • Shuichi Kaminogawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food Bioscience and Biotechnology, College of Bioresource SciencesNihon UniversityFujisawa-shiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Research Center for Food Safety, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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