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Cytotechnology

, Volume 54, Issue 1, pp 1–4 | Cite as

Measurement of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose incorporation into human osteoblast–An experimental method

  • Nahum RosenbergEmail author
  • Lise Bettman
  • Orit Rosenberg
  • Michael Soudry
  • Moshe Gavish
  • Rachel Bar-Shalom
Brief Report

Abstract

An evaluation of human osteoblast metabolism usually involves measurements of the by-products of bone matrix elaboration. The assessment of glycolytic activity of osteoblasts is not a standard tool in most of the reports, but might be of value by providing a direct indicator of cellular metabolism. Measurement of the incorporation of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose, which is not further degradable following its conversion into glycose-6-phosphate during glycolysis and is trapped in this form within the cells, can be used as an effective research tool for estimation of osteoblast metabolism. In order to estimate the [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose incorporation we used cultured human osteoblast-like cells. Following incubation of the culture samples in a glucose free medium with 5 μ Ci [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose we measured the radioactivity of the cell fraction, as a percent from the initial dose, and compared to the incorporation values in cells treated by protoporphyrine IX (10−5 M), an endogenous pro-apoptotic agent. To compare the response of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose incorporation studies, following treatment of cells with the protoporphyrine IX, to other experimental cell metabolism evaluation methods, we performed a parallel comparison of alkaline phospatase activity, which is a standard measurement tool of osteoblast metabolism, in the control and treatment groups. A narrow range of 0.22–1.36% of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose incorporation per million cells was found. Additionally in the protoporphyrine IX treated cells a significant 62% decrease of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose incorporation was observed (p < .05). A parallel significant decrease in alkaline phosphatase activity (p < .001) was found in the cells treated by the protoporphyrine IX. Therefore we suggest that the presented method of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose incorporation measurement can be utilized as an effective research tool for estimation of the cellular glycolitic activity in human osteoblast-like cells in vitro.

Keywords

[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose Cellular incorporation Metabolism Osteoblast Glycolysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nahum Rosenberg
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  • Lise Bettman
    • 2
  • Orit Rosenberg
    • 3
  • Michael Soudry
    • 1
    • 3
  • Moshe Gavish
    • 3
  • Rachel Bar-Shalom
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery “A”Rambam Medical CenterHaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Nuclear Medicine DepartmentRambam Medical CenterHaifaIsrael
  3. 3.Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of MedicineTechnion–Israel Institute of TechnologyHaifaIsrael

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