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Non-death Loss: Grieving for the Loss of Familiar Place and for Precious Time and Associated Opportunities

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Abstract

Grieving for the non-death losses of one’s place and all that is familiar and the loss of precious time and the associated opportunities go largely unnoticed in society as well as in the profession’s literature and practice. Too often, people are left on their own to grieve and suffer from these types of non-death losses. In this article, the authors attempt to broaden the conception of grief by discussing and illustrating two types of more ambiguous non-death losses (Boss, J Fam Theory Rev, 8:269–286, 2016). Each of these types of non-death losses is examined from a theoretical, empirical and clinical perspective.

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Notes

  1. The practice illustrations are based on composites of several clients.

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Correspondence to Alex Gitterman.

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Gitterman, A., Knight, C. Non-death Loss: Grieving for the Loss of Familiar Place and for Precious Time and Associated Opportunities. Clin Soc Work J 47, 147–155 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10615-018-0682-5

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