Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 5–10 | Cite as

Blues and Emotional Trauma

Original Paper

Abstract

The process of bringing the visceral, bodily aspect of emotional experience into language plays a vital role in the working through of painful emotional states. Such visceral-linguistic unities are achieved in a dialogue of emotional understanding, and it is in such dialogue that experiences of emotional trauma can be held and transformed into endurable and namable painful feelings. The blues is a wonderful example of such dialogue. In the unifying experience of the blues, songwriter, performers, and listeners are joined in a visceral-linguistic conversation in which universally traumatizing aspects of human existence can be communally held and borne.

Keywords

Blues Emotional trauma Emotional understanding Existential vulnerability Slavery 

References

  1. Jones, L. (1999). Blues people: Negro music in white America. New York: Harper Collins (Original work published 1963).Google Scholar
  2. Stolorow, R. D. (2007). Trauma and human existence: Autobiographical, psychoanalytic, and philosophical reflections. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Stolorow, R. D. (2011). World, affectivity, trauma: Heidegger and post-Cartesian psychoanalysis. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  4. Vogel, L. (1994). The fragile “we”: Ethical implications of Heidegger’s Being and Time. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© copyright held by wiley 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Contemporary PsychoanalysisLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Santa MonicaUSA
  3. 3.The JazzschoolBerkeleyUSA

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