A Practitioner’s Guide to Sampling in the Age of Evidence-Based Practice: Translation of Research into Practice

Abstract

Evidence-based practice must include the translation of research into practice, and the social work practitioner is the essential link in that translation. As part of the EBP process, researchers must present findings in a way that is accessible to practitioners and practitioners must view the study as relevant and representative of their clients’ needs. This article provides practitioners with tools to interpret research, specifically the sampling process. Our goal is to support practitioners in bridging the gap between research and practice. We discuss how sampling fits with the translation of research and describe sampling procedures. We conclude with a unique three-step approach for reviewing research that is designed to assist practitioners to translate research into practice.

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Acknowledgments

A special thanks to Maeda Galinsky, Kenan Distinguished Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Social Work for her critical insights and feedback.

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Correspondence to Carrie Pettus-Davis.

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Pettus-Davis, C., Grady, M.D., Cuddeback, G.S. et al. A Practitioner’s Guide to Sampling in the Age of Evidence-Based Practice: Translation of Research into Practice. Clin Soc Work J 39, 379–389 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10615-011-0345-2

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Keywords

  • Evidence-based-practice
  • Translation
  • Sampling
  • Empirically-supported-interventions
  • Research-to-practice