Critical Criminology

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 49–73 | Cite as

Latina Fortitude in the Face of Disadvantage: Exploring the Conditioning Effects of Ethnic Identity and Gendered Ethnic Identity on Latina Offending

Article

Abstract

Recent literature has investigated if socialization and identity protect against the criminogenic effects of strainful experiences for African Americans. Here Latinas are brought to the forefront. This study not only investigates if a positive ethnic identity increases fortitude against strainful events, but if its effects are further influenced by gender socialization. Results reveal ethnic identity increases resilience against the criminogenic effects of vicarious victimization and acculturation and gendered ethnic identity protects against direct victimization. This study reinforces the need for further investigation into cultural explanations for within group differences in criminogenic outcomes.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, African American Studies ProgramUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

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