Critical Criminology

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 21–34 | Cite as

Queer Criminology, Critique, and the “Art of Not Being Governed”

Article

Abstract

This article builds on previous work that argues that a useful path for a “queer/ed criminology” to follow is one that takes “queer” to denote a position. It suggests that one way of developing such an approach is to adopt a particular understanding of critique—specifically one that draws from Michel Foucault’s view of critique as “the art of not being governed.” It then charts some of the possible directions for such a “queer/ed criminology.” While such an approach to critique has previously been discussed within critical criminologies, this article suggests that it is useful for queer criminologists to explore the opportunities that it affords, particularly in order to better appreciate how “queer/ed criminology” might connect to, draw from, or push against other currents among critical criminologies, and help to delineate the unique contribution that this kind of “queer/ed criminology” might make.

References

  1. Ball, M. (2013). The use of “queer” in criminal justice discourses. In K. Richards & J. Tauri (Eds.), Crime, justice and social democracy: proceedings of the 2nd international conference, 2013 (Vol. 1, pp. 1–9). Brisbane: Crime and Justice Research Center, QUT.Google Scholar
  2. Ball, M. (2014). What’s queer about queer criminology? In D. Peterson & V. Panfil (Eds.), The handbook of lgbt communities, crime, and justice. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  3. Bessant, J. (2002). Left, right, or straight ahead: Contemporary prospects for progressive and critical criminology. In K. Carrington & R. Hogg (Eds.), Critical criminology: Issues, debates, challenges (pp. 218–242). Devon: Willan Publishing.Google Scholar
  4. Brown, W. (1995). States of injury: Power and freedom in late modernity. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Brown, D. (2002). ‘Losing my religion’: Reflections on critical criminology in Australia. In K. Carrington & R. Hogg (Eds.), Critical criminology: Issues, debates, challenges (pp. 73–113). Devon: Willan Publishing.Google Scholar
  6. Butler, J. (1995). For a careful reading. In S. Benhabib, J. Butler, D. Cornell, & N. Fraser (Eds.), Feminist contentions: A philosophical exchange (pp. 127–143). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  7. Butler, J. (2004a). Precarious life: The powers of mourning and violence. London: Verso.Google Scholar
  8. Butler, J. (2004b). Undoing gender. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Butler, J. (2004c). What is critique? An essay on Foucault’s virtue. http://eipcp.net/transversal/0806/butler/en. Accessed 10 April 2013.
  10. Butler, J. (2009). Frames of war: When is life grievable?. London: Verso.Google Scholar
  11. Carlen, P. (1998). Criminology Ltd: The search for a paradigm. In P. Walton & J. Young (Eds.), The new criminology revisited (pp. 64–75). Houndmills: Macmillan Press.Google Scholar
  12. Carlen, P. (2011). Against evangelism in academic criminology: For criminology as a scientific art. In M. Bosworth & C. Hoyle (Eds.), What is criminology? (pp. 95–108). Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Carrington, K. (2002). Feminism and critical criminology: Confronting genealogies. In K. Carrington & R. Hogg (Eds.), Critical criminology: Issues, debates, challenges (pp. 114–142). Devon: Willan Publishing.Google Scholar
  14. Carrington, K., & Hogg, R. (2002). Critical criminologies: An introduction. In K. Carrington & R. Hogg (Eds.), Critical criminology: Issues, debates, challenges (pp. 1–12). Devon: Willan Publishing.Google Scholar
  15. Cohen, S. (1998). Intellectual scepticism and political commitment: The case of radical criminology. In P. Walton & J. Young (Eds.), The new criminology revisited (pp. 98–129). Houndmills: Macmillan Press.Google Scholar
  16. Cunneen, C. (2011). Postcolonial perspectives for criminology. In M. Bosworth & C. Hoyle (Eds.), What is criminology? (pp. 249–266). Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Currie, E. (2002). Preface. In K. Carrington & R. Hogg (Eds.), Critical criminology: Issues, debates, challenges (pp. 7–9). Devon: Willan Publishing.Google Scholar
  18. Dean, M. (1994). Critical and effective histories: Foucault’s methods and historical sociology. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Dean, M. (2010). Governmentality: Power and rule in modern society (2nd ed.). London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  20. DeKeseredy, W. (2011). Contemporary critical criminology. Oxon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  21. Derrida, J. (1990). Force of law: The mystical foundations of authority. Cardozo Law Review, 11, 920–1045.Google Scholar
  22. Duggan, L. (2001). Making it perfectly queer. In A. Herrmann & A. J. Stewart (Eds.), Theorising feminism: Parallel trends in the humanities and social sciences (2nd ed., pp. 215–231). Boulder: Westview Press.Google Scholar
  23. Duggan, L. (2003). The twilight of equality? Neoliberalism, cultural politics, and the attack on democracy. Boston: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
  24. Eng, D., Halberstam, J., & Muñoz, J. E. (2005). Introduction: What’s queer about queer studies now? Social Text, 23(3–4), 1–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Erbaugh, E. (2007). Queering approaches to intimate partner violence. In L. O’Toole, J. Schiffman, & M. Kiter Edwards (Eds.), Gender violence: Interdisciplinary perspectives (2nd ed., pp. 451–459). New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Foucault, M. (1978). What is critique? In S. Lotringer (Ed.), The politics of truth (pp. 41–81). Los Angeles: Semiotext(e).Google Scholar
  27. Foucault, M. (1982). The subject and power. In J. Faubion (Ed.), Power: Essential works of foucault 1954–1984 (Vol. 3, pp. 326–348). London: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  28. Foucault, M. (1983). On the genealogy of ethics: An overview of work in progress. In P. Rabinow (Ed.), Ethics: Subjectivity and truth. Essential works of foucault 1954–1984: Volume 1 (pp. 253–280). London: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  29. Foucault, M. (1998). The will to knowledge: The history of sexuality (Vol. 1). London: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  30. Giffney, N. (2004). Denormatizing queer theory: More than (simply) lesbian and gay studies. Feminist Theory, 5(1), 73–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Giffney, N. (2009). Introduction: The “q” word. In N. Giffney & M. O’Rourke (Eds.), The Ashgate research companion to queer theory (pp. 1–13). Farnham: Ashgate Publishing.Google Scholar
  32. Halperin, D. (1995). Saint foucault: Towards a gay hagiography. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Jagose, A. (1996). Queer theory. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Lea, J. (1998). Criminology and postmodernity. In P. Walton & J. Young (Eds.), The new criminology revisited (pp. 163–189). Houndmills: Macmillan Press.Google Scholar
  35. Mogul, J. L., Ritchie, A. J., & Whitlock, K. (2011). Queer (in)justice: The criminalization of LGBT people in the United States. Boston: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
  36. Mooney, J. (2012). Finding a political voice: The emergence of critical criminology in Britain. In W. DeKeseredy & M. Dragiewicz (Eds.), Routledge handbook of critical criminology (pp. 13–31). Oxon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  37. Pavlich, G. (1999). Criticism and criminology: In search of legitimacy. Theoretical Criminology, 3(1), 29–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Pavlich, G. (2001). The art of critique or how not to be governed thus. In G. Wickham & G. Pavlich (Eds.), Rethinking law, society and governance: Foucault’s bequest (pp. 141–154). Oxford: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
  39. Puar, J. K. (2007). Terrorist assemblages: Homonationalism in queer times. Durham: Duke University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Ristock, J. (Ed.). (2011). Intimate partner violence in LGBTQ lives. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  41. Sedgwick, E. K. (2011). The weather in Proust. Durham: Duke University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Sullivan, N. (2003). A critical introduction to queer theory. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  43. Willig, R. (2012). Recognition and critique: An interview with Judith Butler. Distinktion: Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory, 13(1), 139–144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Woods, J. B. (2014). “Queering criminology”: Overview of the state of the field. In D. Peterson & V. Panfil (Eds.), The handbook of LGBT communities, crime, and justice. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  45. Yar, M. (2012). Critical criminology, critical theory and social harm. In S. Hall & S. Winlow (Eds.), New directions in criminological theory (pp. 52–65). Oxon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  46. Young, J. (1998). Breaking windows: Situating the new criminology. In P. Walton & J. Young (Eds.), The new criminology revisited (pp. 14–46). Houndmills: Macmillan Press.Google Scholar
  47. Young, J. (2002). Critical criminology in the twenty-first century: Critique, irony and the always unfinished. In K. Carrington & R. Hogg (Eds.), Critical criminology: Issues, debates, challenges (pp. 251–274). Devon: Willan Publishing.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of JusticeQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.Centre for Sex, Gender and SexualitiesDurham UniversityDurhamUK

Personalised recommendations