Crime, Law and Social Change

, Volume 65, Issue 1–2, pp 1–27 | Cite as

Pursuit of justice and the victims of war in Bosnia and Herzegovina: An exploratory study

Article

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a 2007 survey of victims of war crimes and crimes against humanity from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Our results show that the ICTY is the primary decision-maker for war crimes and crimes against humanity of their choice, particularly for the trials of military and political leaders. The respondents who reported being raped, beaten, and starved were more supportive of the ICTY than the other respondents were. The respondents who evaluated the ICTY as fair and who testified at the Court of BiH were more likely to select the ICTY as the preferred decision-maker. The respondents evaluated only one domestic court—the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Court of BiH)—as fair.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  2. 2.Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA

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