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Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 42, Issue 5, pp 636–649 | Cite as

Dialectical Behavior Therapy in the Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder and Eating Disorders Comorbidity: A Pilot Study in a Naturalistic Setting

  • Maria V. Navarro-Haro
  • Cristina Botella
  • Verónica Guillen
  • Reyes Moliner
  • Heliodoro Marco
  • Mercedes Jorquera
  • Rosa Baños
  • Azucena Garcia-Palacios
Original Article

Abstract

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has been shown to be successful in the treatment of borderline personality disorder and eating disorders separately. The present study compares Standard Dialectical Behavior Therapy with a Treatment as Usual Cognitive Behavior Therapy (TAU CBT) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder and eating disorders comorbid features. A total of 118 women diagnosed with borderline personality disorders and eating disorders were assigned to one of two treatment groups in a naturalistic setting (DBT = 71; TAU CBT = 47). DBT showed a greater decrease in dysfunctional behaviors used to regulate emotions and related to borderline personality disorder (i.e. substance abuse, impulsive money spending, unprotected sex, etc.), non-suicidal self-injuries, and depressive symptoms, as well as an increase in cognitive reappraisal and global functioning. DBT and TAU CBT showed similar improvements in suicide attempts, dysfunctional eating behaviors (i.e. binge eating, purgative behaviors, and restriction), hospitalizations, negative and positive affect, and expressive suppression. Results of this study support the utility and effectiveness of standard DBT for comorbid borderline personality disorder and eating disorders in naturalistic settings. Replications of this study and randomized controlled trials are needed.

Keywords

Personality disorders Eating disorders Borderline personality disorder Transdiagnostic Dialectical Behavior Therapy Naturalistic setting 

Notes

Funding

The Funding was provided by Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, Spain, proyectos de investigación fundamental no orientada (PSI2010-21423/PSIC).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

María Vicenta Navarro-Haro, Cristina Botella, Verónica Guillen, Reyes Moliner, Heliodoro Marco, Mercedes Jorquera, Rosa Baños and Azucena Garcia-Palacios declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Informed Consent

All procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (national and institutional). Informed consent was obtained from all individual subjects participating in the study.

Research involving with Human and Animal Participants

No animal studies were carried out by the authors for this article.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria V. Navarro-Haro
    • 3
  • Cristina Botella
    • 1
    • 2
  • Verónica Guillen
    • 6
  • Reyes Moliner
    • 5
  • Heliodoro Marco
    • 5
  • Mercedes Jorquera
    • 4
    • 5
  • Rosa Baños
    • 2
    • 6
  • Azucena Garcia-Palacios
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departamento de Psicologia Basica, Clinica y PsicobiologiaUniversitat Jaume ICastellonSpain
  2. 2.Ciber Fisiopatología Obesidad y NutriciónCB06/03 Instituto Salud Carlos IIISantiago de CompostelaSpain
  3. 3.Hospital Universitari General de CatalunyaBarcelonaSpain
  4. 4.Unidad de Trastornos de la Personalidad PreviCentro Clínico PREVIValenciaSpain
  5. 5.Universidad Católica de Valencia San Vicente MártirValenciaSpain
  6. 6.Departamento de Personalidad, Evaluación y Tratamientos PsicológicosUniversidad de ValenciaValenciaSpain

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