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Brooding Perfectionism: Refining the Roles of Rumination and Perfectionism in the Etiology of Depression

Abstract

The current study examines the hypothesized interaction between certain dimensions of both perfectionism and rumination as diatheses for depressive symptoms. Three hundred and five participants completed measures of perfectionism, rumination, and depressive symptoms at Time 1, and then returned 4 weeks later at Time 2 to complete measures of stress and depressive symptoms. In line with our hypotheses, results indicated that individuals with high levels of certain dimensions of perfectionism (i.e., self-oriented and socially prescribed, but not other-oriented), high levels of brooding rumination (but not the reflection dimension of rumination), and high stress experienced the greatest increases in depressive symptoms over time. Moreover, results revealed that the role of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism as diatheses for depression is dependent upon brooding rumination. This work has potential benefits for understanding the cognitive mechanisms that lead to depression.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    As hypothesized, all results supporting a diathesis-stress model were found with the RSQ-Brood scale, but not the RSQ-Reflect scale. For the sake of brevity, we reported only the RSQ-Brood results.

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Correspondence to Paul Kwon.

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Olson, M.L., Kwon, P. Brooding Perfectionism: Refining the Roles of Rumination and Perfectionism in the Etiology of Depression. Cogn Ther Res 32, 788–802 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-007-9173-7

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Keywords

  • Rumination
  • Brooding
  • Perfectionism
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Longitudinal