Conservation Genetics

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 553–572

Population genetics and geometric morphometrics of the Bombus ephippiatus species complex with implications for its use as a commercial pollinator

  • Michelle A. Duennes
  • Chris Petranek
  • Esteban Pineda Diez de Bonilla
  • Jorge Mérida-Rivas
  • Oscar Martinez-López
  • Philippe Sagot
  • Rémy Vandame
  • Sydney A. Cameron
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10592-016-0903-9

Cite this article as:
Duennes, M.A., Petranek, C., de Bonilla, E.P.D. et al. Conserv Genet (2017) 18: 553. doi:10.1007/s10592-016-0903-9

Abstract

Mexico and Central America are among the most biodiverse regions on Earth, harboring many species with high levels of interpopulation morphological and genetic diversity. The mountainous topography of this region contains isolated sky island habitats that have the potential to promote speciation. This has been studied in vertebrates, yet few studies have examined the phylogeographic and genetic structure of insect species encompassing this region. Here we investigate geographic patterns of genetic and morphological divergence and speciation among widespread populations of the highly polymorphic bumble bee Bombus ephippiatus and its closest relative B. wilmattae. We used DNA sequences from a fragment of cytochrome oxidase I (COI), genotypes for twelve microsatellite markers, and morphometric data from wings to construct a well-supported inference of the divergences among these taxa. We have found complex patterns of genetic isolation and morphological divergence within B. ephippiatus across its geographic range and present evidence that B. ephippiatus comprises multiple independent evolutionary lineages. The pattern of their diversification corresponds to geographic and environmental isolating mechanisms, including the Mexican highlands, the lowlands of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in southern Mexico, the Nicaraguan Depression, the patchily distributed volcanic ranges in Nuclear Central America and Pleistocene glacial cycles. These results have important implications for the development and distribution of B. ephippiatus as a commercial pollinator in Mexico and Central America.

Keywords

Bumble bees Microsatellites Cytochrome oxidase I STRUCTURE GENELAND Species delimitation 

Supplementary material

10592_2016_903_MOESM1_ESM.docx (81.7 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 83630 kb)

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation
    Comisión Nacional para el Uso y el Conocimiento de la Biodiversidad
    • JE016
    Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología
    • 106043
    National Science Foundation U.S.-Mexico International Program
    • 0503834

    Copyright information

    © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

    Authors and Affiliations

    • Michelle A. Duennes
      • 1
      • 4
    • Chris Petranek
      • 1
      • 5
    • Esteban Pineda Diez de Bonilla
      • 2
      • 6
    • Jorge Mérida-Rivas
      • 2
    • Oscar Martinez-López
      • 2
      • 3
    • Philippe Sagot
      • 2
    • Rémy Vandame
      • 2
    • Sydney A. Cameron
      • 1
    1. 1.Department of Entomology, School of Integrative BiologyUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA
    2. 2.Departamento Agricultura, Sociedad y AmbienteEl Colegio de la Frontera SurSan Cristóbal De Las CasasMexico
    3. 3.Unidad para la Conservación, Uso y Valoración de la Biodiversidad, Centro de Estudios Conservacionistas, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y FarmaciaUniversidad de San Carlos de GuatemalaCuidad De GuatemalaGuatemala
    4. 4.Department of Entomology, College of Natural and Agricultural SciencesUniversity of California, RiversideRiversideUSA
    5. 5.Department of Zoology & PhysiologyUniversity of WyomingLaramieUSA
    6. 6.Instituto de Ciencias BiológicasUniversidad de Ciencias y Artes de ChiapasTuxtla GutiérrezMexico

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