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Conservation Genetics

, 10:1825 | Cite as

Development of micro satellite markers for a critically endangered species, Ceropegia fantastica from the Western Ghats, India

  • R. C. Sumangala
  • L. Naveen Kumar
  • B. T. Ramesha
  • R. Uma Shaanker
  • K. N. Ganeshaiah
  • G. RavikanthEmail author
Technical Note

Abstract

Ceropegia fantastica L. (Asclepiadaceae) is a highly endemic and endangered species in the Western Ghats of India. Fourteen microsatellite markers were developed for C. fantastica. Eight microsatellite primers screened had 2–5 alleles per locus and the observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.48 to 0.83 and 0.48 to 0.62, respectively. The primers were also evaluated for their cross amplification against two related species Ceropegia hirsuta and Ceropegia oculata. The microsatellites developed for this species could be used for addressing population genetics of this endemic and critically endangered species.

Keywords

Microsatellites Ceropegia fantastica Western Ghats Asclepiadaceae Cross amplification Endangered species 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was funded to RG by the Department of Biotechnology (DBT), Government of India under the species recovery programme for Ceropegia fantastica (BT/7055/BCE/08/441/2006). We thank Prof. S. R. Yadav, Shivaji University, Kolhapur for assistance in collection and identification of the species.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. C. Sumangala
    • 1
  • L. Naveen Kumar
    • 1
  • B. T. Ramesha
    • 2
  • R. Uma Shaanker
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • K. N. Ganeshaiah
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • G. Ravikanth
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Conservation Genetics LaboratoryAshoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the EnvironmentHebbal, BangaloreIndia
  2. 2.School of Ecology and ConservationUniversity of Agricultural SciencesBangaloreIndia
  3. 3.Department of Crop PhysiologyUniversity of Agricultural SciencesBangaloreIndia
  4. 4.Department of Forestry and Environmental SciencesUniversity of Agricultural SciencesBangaloreIndia

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