Conservation Genetics

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 1021–1023 | Cite as

Development of twenty-five polymorphic microsatellite markers for the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis)

  • Jennifer A. Fike
  • Giri Athrey
  • Reed Bowman
  • Paul L. Leberg
  • Olin E. RhodesJr.
Technical Note

Abstract

Twenty-five polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis). The number of alleles ranged from two to five and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.036 to 0.750. These loci should be useful tools for conducting research towards the management and conservation of this species.

Keywords

Microsatellite Red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis 

References

  1. Beheler AS, Fike JA, Murfitt LM, Rhodes OE Jr, Serfass TS (2004) Development of polymorphic microsatellite loci for North American river otters (Lontra canadensis) and amplification in related Mustelids. Mol Ecol Notes 4:56–58. doi:10.1046/j.1471-8286.2003.00564.x CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Daniels SJ, Walters JR (2000) Inbreeding depression and its effect on natal dispersal in red-cockaded woodpeckers. Condor 102:482–491. doi:10.1650/0010-5422(2000)102[0482:IDAIEO]2.0.CO;2 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Haig SM, Rhymer JM, Heckel DG (1994) Population differentiation in randomly amplified polymorphic DNA of red-cockaded woodpeckers Picoides borealis. Mol Ecol 3:581–595. doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.1994.tb00089.x PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Haig SM, Bowman R, Mullins TD (1996) Population structure of red-cockaded woodpeckers in south Florida: RAPDs revisited. Mol Ecol 5:725–734. doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.1996.tb00369.x CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Hamilton MB, Pincus EL, Di Fiore A, Fleischer RC (1999) Universal linker and ligation procedures for construction of genomic DNA libraries enriched for microsatellites. Biotechniques 27:500–507PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Hauswaldt SJ, Glenn TC (2003) Microsatellite DNA loci from the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin). Mol Ecol Notes 3:174–176. doi:10.1046/j.1471-8286.2003.00388.x CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Jackson JA (1971) The evolution, taxonomy, distribution, past populations and current status of the red-cockaded woodpecker. In: Thompson RL (ed) The ecology and management of the red-cockaded woodpecker. Tall Timbers Research Station, Tallahassee, FLGoogle Scholar
  8. Marshall TC, Slate J, Kruuk LEB, Pemberton JM (1998) Statistical confidence for likelihood-based paternity inference in natural populations. Mol Ecol 7:639–655. doi:10.1046/j.1365-294x.1998.00374.x PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Raymond M, Rousset F (2000) genepop version 3.4. Available at http://wbiomed.curtin.edu.au/genepop
  10. Rozen S, Skaletsky HJ (2000) primer3. Available at http://frodo.wi.mit.edu/cgi-bin/primer3/primer3_www.cgi
  11. Stangel PW, Lennartz MR, Smith MH (1992) Genetic variation and population structure of red-cockaded woodpeckers. Conserv Bio 6:283–292CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer A. Fike
    • 1
  • Giri Athrey
    • 2
  • Reed Bowman
    • 3
  • Paul L. Leberg
    • 2
  • Olin E. RhodesJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forestry and Natural ResourcesPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of Louisiana at LafayetteLafayetteUSA
  3. 3.Archbold Biological StationLake PlacidUSA

Personalised recommendations