Conservation Genetics

, Volume 9, Issue 5, pp 1243–1251

Implications of social dominance and multiple paternity for the genetic diversity of a captive-bred reptile population (tuatara)

  • Jennifer A. Moore
  • Nicola J. Nelson
  • Susan N. Keall
  • Charles H. Daugherty
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10592-007-9452-6

Cite this article as:
Moore, J.A., Nelson, N.J., Keall, S.N. et al. Conserv Genet (2008) 9: 1243. doi:10.1007/s10592-007-9452-6

Abstract

Captive breeding is an integral part of many species recovery plans. Knowledge of the genetic mating system is essential for effective management of captive stocks and release groups, and can help to predict patterns of genetic diversity in reintroduced populations. Here we investigate the poorly understood mating system of a threatened, ancient reptile (tuatara) on Little Barrier Island, New Zealand and discuss its impact on the genetic diversity. This biologically significant population was thought to be extinct, due to introduced predators, until 8 adults (4 males, 4 females) were rediscovered in 1991/92. We genotyped these adults and their 121 captively-bred offspring, hatched between 1994 to 2005, at five microsatellite loci. Multiple paternity was found in 18.8% of clutches. Male variance in reproductive success was high with one male dominating mating (77.5% of offspring sired) and one male completely restricted from mating. Little Barrier Island tuatara, although clearly having undergone a demographic bottleneck, are retaining relatively high levels of remnant genetic diversity which may be complemented by the presence of multiple paternity. High variance in reproductive success has decreased the effective size of this population to approximately 4 individuals. Manipulation to equalize founder representation was not successful, and the mating system has thus had a large impact on the genetic diversity of this recovering population. Although population growth has been successful, in the absence of migrants this population is likely at risk of future inbreeding and genetic bottleneck.

Keywords

Sphenodon  Mating system Effective population size Polygyny New Zealand 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer A. Moore
    • 1
  • Nicola J. Nelson
    • 1
  • Susan N. Keall
    • 1
  • Charles H. Daugherty
    • 1
  1. 1.Allan Wilson Centre, School of Biological SciencesVictoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand

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