Advertisement

Conservation Genetics

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 757–759 | Cite as

Twenty four new microsatellite markers in two invasive pavement ants, Tetramorium sp.E and T. tsushimae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

  • Florian M. Steiner
  • Wolfgang Arthofer
  • Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner
  • Ross H. Crozier
  • Christian Stauffer
Technical Note

Abstract

Invasive species trigger biodiversity losses and alter ecosystem functioning, with life history shaping invasiveness (Sakai et al., Annu Rev Ecol Syst 32:305–332, 2001). However, pinpointing the relation of a specific life history to invasion success is difficult. One approach may be comparing congeners. The two Palearctic pavement ants, Tetramorium sp.E (widely known as T. caespitum, Schlick-Steiner et al., Mol Phylogenet Evol 40:259–273, 2006) and T. tsushimae have invaded North America (Steiner et al., Biol Invasions 8:117–123, 2006). Their life histories differ in that T. sp.E has separate single-queened colonies but T. tsushimae multi-queened colonies scattered over large areas (Sanada-Morimura et al., Insect Soc 53:141–148, 2006; Schlick-Steiner et al., Mol Phylogenet Evol 40:259–273, 2006; Steiner et al., Biol Invasions 8:117–123, 2006). Comparison of the genetic diversity in the entire native and non-native ranges will elucidate the invasion histories. Here, we present 13 and 11 microsatellites, developed for T. sp.E and T. tsushimae, respectively, and characterize all for both species.

Keywords

Invasion history Invasive ants Life history Microsatellites Tetramorium 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank N. Aktaç, M. Balint, D. Fontaneto, C. Guofa, M. Hayashi, J. Heinze, V. Kochnev, Y. Kochnev, T. Ljubomirov, D.-P. Lyu, M. Maruyama, H. Mori, J. Pontin, E. Provost, L. Qiang, H. Sakai, M. Sanetra, E. Tikhonov, M. Würmli for sample donations; S. Krumböck and A. Stradner, for technical support. FMS was supported by the Austrian Science Fund, J2642-B17.

References

  1. Raymond M, Rousset F (1995) genepop Version 1.2: population genetics software for exact tests and ecumenism. J Heredity 86:248–249Google Scholar
  2. Sakai AK, Allendorf FW, Holt JS et al (2001) The population biology of invasive species. Annu Rev Ecol Syst 32:305–332CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Sanada-Morimura S, Satoh T, Obara Y (2006) Territorial behavior and temperature preference for nesting sites in a pavement ant Tetramorium tsushimae. Insect Soc 53:141–148CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Schlick-Steiner BC, Steiner FM, Moder K et al (2006) A multidisciplinary approach reveals cryptic diversity in western Palaearctic Tetramorium ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Mol Phylogenet Evol 40:259–273PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Steiner FM, Schlick-Steiner BC, Trager JC et al (2006) Tetramorium tsushimae, a new invasive ant in North America. Biol Invasions 8:117–123CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Zane L, Bargelloni L, Patarnello T (2002) Strategies for microsatellite isolation: a review. Mol Ecol 11:1–16PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Florian M. Steiner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Wolfgang Arthofer
    • 1
  • Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ross H. Crozier
    • 3
  • Christian Stauffer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Forest Entomology, Forest Pathology and Forest Protection, Department of Forest and Soil SciencesUniversity of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.Institute of Zoology, Department of Integrative Biology and Biodiversity Research, BokuUniversity of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences ViennaViennaAustria
  3. 3.School of Marine and Tropical Biology, DB23James Cook UniversityTownsvilleAustralia

Personalised recommendations