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Conservation Genetics

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 233–237 | Cite as

Tiliqua rugosa microsatellites: isolation via enrichment and characterisation of loci for multiplex PCR in T. rugosa and the endangered T. adelaidensis

  • Michael G. Gardner
  • Juan J. Sanchez
  • Rachael Y. Dudaniec
  • Leah Rheinberger
  • Annabel L. Smith
  • Kathleen M. Saint
Technical Note

Abstract

We used an enrichment technique to isolate 18 novel di and tri microsatellites for the socially monogamous lizard Tiliqua rugosa. These loci were amplified in conjunction with previously described loci in two and three PCR multiplexes for T. rugosa and the endangered T. adelaidensis, respectively. The loci were highly polymorphic in both species, exhibiting between 2 and 32 alleles with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.43 to 0.96. These markers will be useful for population-level analyses and can contribute to a genetic foundation for conservation strategies for the endangered T. adelaidensis.

Keywords

Sociality Microsatellite enrichment Egernia Tiliqua Multiplex PCR Monogamy 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The work was funded by a grant to MGG from the Sir Mark Mitchell Research Foundation

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael G. Gardner
    • 1
    • 2
  • Juan J. Sanchez
    • 3
  • Rachael Y. Dudaniec
    • 1
  • Leah Rheinberger
    • 4
  • Annabel L. Smith
    • 1
  • Kathleen M. Saint
    • 2
    • 5
  1. 1.School of Biological SciencesFlinders UniversityAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.Centre for Evolutionary Biology and BiodiversityUniversity of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.National Institute of Toxicology and Forensic ScienceCanary Islands delegationTenerifeSpain
  4. 4.School of Animal BiologyUniversity of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia
  5. 5.South Australian MuseumNorth TerraceAdelaideAustralia

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