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A Family Affair: Examining the Impact of Parental Infidelity on Children Using a Structural Family Therapy Framework

Abstract

Infidelity has a permeating impact on social systems, but no system is more impacted by infidelity than the nuclear family. This paper examines the impact of parental infidelity on the family using a structural family therapy (SFT) framework. Conceptualizing and treating infidelity from an SFT approach provides a systemic understanding of how interactions between the parental units about infidelity impact parent–child dynamics. Clinical recommendations are outlined for couple and family therapists to help families find healthy and adaptable ways to create and maintain structures that minimize the harmful impact of infidelity on the family system.

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Negash, S., Morgan, M.L. A Family Affair: Examining the Impact of Parental Infidelity on Children Using a Structural Family Therapy Framework. Contemp Fam Ther 38, 198–209 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10591-015-9364-4

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Keywords

  • Parental infidelity
  • Structured family therapy
  • Boundaries
  • Children