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Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 277–281 | Cite as

A Report: Couples with Medical Conditions, Attachment Theoretical Perspectives and Evidence for Emotionally-Focused Couples Therapy

  • Jennifer Fitzgerald
  • James Thomas
Original Paper

Abstract

This brief report examines the contribution of Emotionally-focused Therapy for distressed couples, particularly in the context of medical illness. An attachment theoretical framework is provided to assist in understanding individual differences in the experience of both the ill and the care-giving partner.

Keywords

EFT for couples Attachment Emotional bonds Medical illness 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Discipline of PsychiatryThe University of QueenslandHerstonAustralia
  2. 2.Denver Family InstituteDenverUSA

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