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Community Family Therapy with Military Families Experiencing Deployment

Abstract

The length and frequency of deployments in the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are associated with increased vulnerability for both part- and full-time military families who stand to benefit from systems-oriented practice by marriage and family therapists. Community Family Therapy (CFT) is a modality designed to promote resilience both within and beyond the four walls of the therapy room, facilitate family connections in the community, and empower them for local leadership. The effects of deployment on families are summarized and CFT principles are adapted as a framework for intervention with this population.

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Correspondence to W. Glenn Hollingsworth.

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Hollingsworth, W.G. Community Family Therapy with Military Families Experiencing Deployment. Contemp Fam Ther 33, 215–228 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10591-011-9144-8

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Keywords

  • Community engagement
  • Deployment
  • Family therapy
  • Military families