Epigenetic Model of Marital Expectations

Abstract

The Epigenetic model of understanding marital expectations of Bhatti focuses on the domains of (a) expectations from the partner, (b) expectations from marriage, (c) expectations of and from the partner’s family of origin, (d) expectations of the institution of marriage, and (e) the concept of an “ideal partner,” and helps in understanding how martial expectations are influenced by various factors in the person’s life. The underlying assumption is that the spouses enter the marriage with expectations (on all the above mentioned domains), which are facts and exist at a conscious level in the social reality. These indicators further evolve, refine, and change across the span of the marriage. This model has formed the framework for marital therapy and other interventions. This paper highlights the application of this model in marital therapy with couples with marital dysfunction.

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Correspondence to Srilatha Juvva.

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Juvva, S., Bhatti, R.S. Epigenetic Model of Marital Expectations. Contemp Fam Ther 28, 61–72 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10591-006-9695-2

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Keywords

  • case illustration
  • epigenetic model
  • Indian couples
  • marital expectations