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The impact of yoga on the professional and personal life of the psychotherapist

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ABSTRACT

This study explored the impact of a regular practice of yoga in the personal and professional lives of psychotherapists. Six licensed psychotherapists were interviewed about their perceptions regarding the influence of their yoga training on their personal and professional lives. These effects were then categorized into common patterns that emerged as four themes addressing professional growth and the self care of the therapist. These themes are: internal/self awareness, balance, acceptance of self and others, and yoga as a way of life.

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Correspondence to Vincent Valente.

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Valente, V., Marotta, A. The impact of yoga on the professional and personal life of the psychotherapist. Contemp Fam Ther 27, 65–80 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10591-004-1971-4

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