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On the “reality” and reality of anthropogenic climate change

The Original Article was published on 06 March 2013

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References

  1. Gross PR, Levitt N (1994). Higher superstitions: the academic left and its quarrels with science, Johns Hopkins Press; idem., 1997, The flight from science and reason, New York Academy of Sciences Press; see also Alan Sokal, 2010. Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture, Oxford University Press. For a critique of Gross and Levitt from a historical perspective, see Norton Wise, “The enemy without. The enemy within: a review of Gross and Levitt, Higher Superstition” Isis 87 (1996)

  2. Boyd R, Gasper P, Trout JD (eds) (1991) The Philosophy of Science, MIT Press, Cambridge MA

  3. Oreskes N (1999) The rejection of continental drift: theory and method in American Earth Science, Oxford University Press, New York

  4. Fallibilism is a strong argument for adaptive management, but it is not an excuse for quietism or no-nothingism. See Oreskes N (2011). “Working with uncertainty: ‘Unitisation and renegotiation’ as a model for science and environmental policy,” in The politics of science advice: institutional design for quality assurance. Lentsch J, Weingart P (eds), Cambridge University Press, pp. 36–53

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Acknowledgments

Thanks to Nancy Cartwright for comments on an earlier version of this paper, and for guiding my thinking on all the most important issues.

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Correspondence to Naomi Oreskes.

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This comment refers to the article available at doi:10.1007/s10584-013-0711-x.

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Oreskes, N. On the “reality” and reality of anthropogenic climate change. Climatic Change 119, 559–560 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-013-0779-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-013-0779-3

Keywords

  • Climate Change
  • Global Warming
  • Scientific Knowledge
  • Climate Change Impact
  • Tectonic Plate