Climatic Change

, Volume 120, Issue 3, pp 545–556

The impacts of climate change on tribal traditional foods

  • Kathy Lynn
  • John Daigle
  • Jennie Hoffman
  • Frank Lake
  • Natalie Michelle
  • Darren Ranco
  • Carson Viles
  • Garrit Voggesser
  • Paul Williams
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-013-0736-1

Cite this article as:
Lynn, K., Daigle, J., Hoffman, J. et al. Climatic Change (2013) 120: 545. doi:10.1007/s10584-013-0736-1

Abstract

American Indian and Alaska Native tribes are uniquely affected by climate change. Indigenous peoples have depended on a wide variety of native fungi, plant and animal species for food, medicine, ceremonies, community and economic health for countless generations. Climate change stands to impact the species and ecosystems that constitute tribal traditional foods that are vital to tribal culture, economy and traditional ways of life. This paper examines the impacts of climate change on tribal traditional foods by providing cultural context for the importance of traditional foods to tribal culture, recognizing that tribal access to traditional food resources is strongly influenced by the legal and regulatory relationship with the federal government, and examining the multi-faceted relationship that tribes have with places, ecological processes and species. Tribal participation in local, regional and national climate change adaption strategies, with a focus on food-based resources, can inform and strengthen the ability of both tribes and other governmental resource managers to address and adapt to climate change impacts.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathy Lynn
    • 1
  • John Daigle
    • 2
  • Jennie Hoffman
    • 3
  • Frank Lake
    • 4
  • Natalie Michelle
    • 5
  • Darren Ranco
    • 6
  • Carson Viles
    • 7
  • Garrit Voggesser
    • 8
  • Paul Williams
    • 9
  1. 1.Adjunct Research Faculty, Environmental Studies ProgramUniversity of OregonEugeneUSA
  2. 2.School of Forest Resources, 221 Nutting HallUniversity of MaineOronoUSA
  3. 3.EcoAdapt and Jennie Hoffman Research and ConsultingPoulsboUSA
  4. 4.USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research StationReddingUSA
  5. 5.Graduate StudentUniversity of MaineOronoUSA
  6. 6.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of MaineOronoUSA
  7. 7.Undergraduate StudentUniversity of OregonEugeneUSA
  8. 8.Tribal Partnerships Program, National Wildlife FederationBoulderUSA
  9. 9.Suquamish Indian TribeSuquamishUSA

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