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Reconstruction of historical pressure patterns over Japan using two-point pressure–temperature datasets since the nineteenth century

Abstract

The temperature and pressure differences between Tokyo and Nagasaki were used to reconstruct past climate conditions. January and July in each available year since the 1820s were classified into several types with characteristic sea level atmospheric pressure patterns. This results in 18 years of pre-1881 data and a continuous series thereafter. The series indicate that the warming after 1900 (after the end of the so-called Little Ice Age) and again after 1960 can at least partly be attributed to an increase in the frequency of warm circulation pattern types at the expense of cold types. The difference in nature of the shifts in circulation types that occurred in the late nineteenth century compared with that in the late twentieth centuries suggests that the mechanism behind the warming in the late nineteenth century differs from that in the late twentieth century.

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Correspondence to Masumi Zaiki.

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Zaiki, M., Können, G.P., Kimura, K. et al. Reconstruction of historical pressure patterns over Japan using two-point pressure–temperature datasets since the nineteenth century. Climatic Change 95, 231–248 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-009-9563-9

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Keywords

  • Nineteenth Century
  • Reference Period
  • Japan Meteorological Agency
  • Weather Type
  • Circulation Type