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Czechoslovak Journal of Physics

, Volume 56, Supplement 4, pp D43–D48 | Cite as

Radionuclides in produced water from Norwegian oil and gas installations — concentrations and bioavailability

  • D. Ø. Eriksen
  • R. Sidhu
  • E. Strålberg
  • K. I. IdenEmail author
  • K. Hylland
  • A. Ruus
  • O. Røyset
  • M. H. G. Berntssen
  • H. Rye
Article

Abstract

Substantial amounts of produced water, containing elevated levels of radionuclides (mainly 226Ra and 228Ra) are discharged to the sea as a result of oil and gas production on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. So far no study has assessed the potential radiological effects on marine biota in connection with radionuclide discharges to the North Sea. The main objective of the project is to establish radiological safe discharge limits for radium, lead and polonium associated with other components in produced water from oil and gas installations on the Norwegian continental shelf.

This study reports results indicating that the presence of added chemicals such as scale inhibitors in produced water has a marked influence on the formation of radium and barium sulphates when produced water is mixed with sea water. Thus, the mobility and bioavailability of radium (and barium) will be larger than anticipated. Also, the bioavailability of food-borne radium is shown to increase due to presence of such chemicals.

Keywords

Radium 210Pb Produce Water Polonium Barium Sulphate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. [1]
    Gäfvert, T. and Færevik, I.: Natural Radioactivity in Produced Water from the Norwegian Oil and Gas Industry in 2003. NRPA Report 2005: 2, (2005).Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    McCloskey, J.T., Schultz, I.R., and Newman, M.C.: Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 17 (1998) 1524.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Gäfvert T. et al.: Radioactivity in the Marine Environment 2002. Results from the Norwegian National Monitoring Programme (RAME), NRPA Report 2004: 10Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Berntssen M.H.G. et al.: “Radioactivity in produced water from Norwegian oil and gas installations — dietary bioavailability of radium (226Ra) in Atlantic cod by use of production chemicals.” To be publishedGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Bodrogi, E., Kovács, T., Jobbágy, V., and Somlai, J.: Radioprotection, Suppl. 1, 40 (2005) S833.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Ø. Eriksen
    • 1
  • R. Sidhu
    • 1
  • E. Strålberg
    • 1
  • K. I. Iden
    • 1
    Email author
  • K. Hylland
    • 2
  • A. Ruus
    • 2
  • O. Røyset
    • 2
  • M. H. G. Berntssen
    • 3
  • H. Rye
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute for Energy Technology (IFE)Norway
  2. 2.Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA)Norway
  3. 3.National Institute for Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES)Norway
  4. 4.The Foundation for Scientific and Industrial Research (SINTEF)Norway

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