Cellulose

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 1825–1846

A comparative guide to controlled hydrophobization of cellulose nanocrystals via surface esterification

  • Shane X. Peng
  • Huibin Chang
  • Satish Kumar
  • Robert J. Moon
  • Jeffrey P. Youngblood
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10570-016-0912-3

Cite this article as:
Peng, S.X., Chang, H., Kumar, S. et al. Cellulose (2016) 23: 1825. doi:10.1007/s10570-016-0912-3

Abstract

Surface esterification methods of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) using acid anhydrides, acid chlorides, acid catalyzed carboxylic acids, and 1′1-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) activated carboxylic acids were evaluated with acetyl-, hexanoyl-, dodecanoyl-, oleoyl-, and methacryloyl-functionalization. Their grafting efficiency was investigated using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and 13C solid state NMR spectroscopy. Acid anhydride and CDI were found to be the most applicable reagents to graft short and long chain aliphatic carbons, respectively. The preservation of structural morphology and crystallinity of grafted CNCs were confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The hydrophobicity of grafted CNCs was evaluated by dispersing them in organic solvents with different Hansen’s solubility parameters. The dispersibility of grafted CNCs in organic solvents was improved by using never-dried CNCs as source materials and keep CNCs wet in their washing solvents after grafting, thus increasing the solvency range to disperse CNCs.

Keywords

Cellulose nanocrystals Esterification Hydrophobicity Hansen’s solubility parameters Dispersibility 

Supplementary material

10570_2016_912_MOESM1_ESM.docx (3.4 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 3478 kb)

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
National Science Foundation (US)
  • 1144843-DGE
Forest Products Laboratory (US)
  • 11-JV-11111129-118

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shane X. Peng
    • 1
  • Huibin Chang
    • 2
    • 3
  • Satish Kumar
    • 2
    • 3
  • Robert J. Moon
    • 1
    • 4
  • Jeffrey P. Youngblood
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Materials EngineeringPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.School of Materials Science and EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.Renewable Bioproducts InstituteGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  4. 4.Forest Products LaboratoryUSDA Forest ServiceMadisonUSA

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