Novel cotton cellulose by cationisation during the mercerisation process—part 1: chemical and morphological changes

Abstract

Cationisation is the modification of cotton cellulose by using quaternary ammonium compounds that block negative OH groups, thus resulting in electropositive cotton cellulose. It is an alternative method for achieving better adsorption of chemical compounds and substances, such as dyestuffs, fluorescent whitening agents, and other textile auxiliaries. The cationisation of cotton cellulose changes the surface electrical charge (electrokinetic potential) by significantly increasing its adsorption properties. The presented article investigated the chemical and morphological changes in cotton cellulose when cationised with an epihalohydrin, 2,3-epoxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride, after and during the mercerisation process. When comparing mercerised cotton with cationised cotton, it was concluded that cationisation during the mercerisation process using short-chain cationic compounds would result in a novel cotton cellulose that would bring a new dimension to cotton pre-treatment and finishing. The modified cotton would retain all the beneficial properties of mercerised cotton with a change of surface charge that would ensure further improvement in quality.

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Correspondence to Anita Tarbuk.

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Tarbuk, A., Grancaric, A.M. & Leskovac, M. Novel cotton cellulose by cationisation during the mercerisation process—part 1: chemical and morphological changes. Cellulose 21, 2167–2179 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10570-014-0245-z

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Keywords

  • Cotton cellulose
  • Cationisation
  • DP
  • SEM
  • FTIR
  • TGA
  • Electrokinetic phenomena