An Integrated Model of Regulation for Applied Settings

Abstract

A growing body of research explores the ways in which regulatory skills are important contributors to school readiness, school success, and other positive developmental outcomes in childhood and throughout the lifespan. Research and theory suggest that children with strong regulatory skills may be better equipped to manage the complex academic, social, and emotional demands of early learning and school environments; and alternatively, deficits in regulatory skills can lead to problems in school adjustment, academic outcomes, and other measures of well-being. In this paper, we bring together two regulation-related research traditions: executive function (EF) and effortful control (EC). We highlight the common features of EF and EC and their key differences. Building on findings from these two research traditions, we propose an integrated model of regulation for school-based interventions and other applied settings that can serve as an organizing framework for a broad set of skills across the cognitive, social, and emotion domains that are critical to school success. Using a developmental psychopathology framework, we illustrate how an integrated model of regulation can inform more nuanced and targeted approaches to research, policy, and intervention for both special and universal populations. We end the paper with a set of recommendations for the next decade of developmental and prevention research focused on self-regulation.

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Bailey, R., Jones, S.M. An Integrated Model of Regulation for Applied Settings. Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 22, 2–23 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00288-y

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Keywords

  • Self-regulation
  • School-based intervention
  • Developmental model