Family Dynamic and Antisocial Adolescents in Macau

Abstract

Background

The present study aims to delineate the effects of family violence and parent–adolescent conflict on antisocial behavior exhibited by adolescents in the Chinese casino city of Macau. The social interaction perspective indicates the significance of coercive family processes in relation to adolescents’ antisocial behavior, and the related moderating role of positive parenting behavior. How this process is experienced by Chinese Macau adolescents, who are influenced by traditional Chinese culture, is explored.

Objectives

This article examines the relationship of family violence and parent–adolescent conflict with adolescents’ antisocial behavior in Macau. It also examines the possible moderating role of parental support in this relationship.

Method

Using a stratified proportional approach, a random sample of 1889 Grade 7 to Grade 12 students was taken from Macau high schools. The young people reported their neutral/positive behavior and delinquent behavior, family conflict, and emotional and instrumental support they received from parents.

Results

Multiple regression analyses suggest that family violence and parent–adolescent conflict are correlated with adolescent antisocial behavior. Moreover, both instrumental and emotional support from parents can moderate the effect of family conflict on adolescents’ antisocial behavior.

Conclusions

Parents providing instrumental and emotional support to Macau Chinese adolescents is negatively correlated with adolescent antisocial behavior in Macau. In view of the long and unstable working hours of parents working in a gambling city, social workers in Macau could develop more innovative programs to support parents in Macau.

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Correspondence to Andrew Yiu Tsang Low.

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Low, A.Y.T., Lo, T.W. & Cheng, C.H.K. Family Dynamic and Antisocial Adolescents in Macau. Child Youth Care Forum (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10566-020-09568-z

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Keywords

  • Family conflict
  • Parental support
  • Delinquency
  • Antisocial behavior
  • Macau