Cell and Tissue Banking

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 209–218 | Cite as

Isolation of human dermis derived mesenchymal stem cells using explants culture method: expansion and phenotypical characterization

  • Jeong-Ran Park
  • Eunjeong Kim
  • Jungwon Yang
  • Hanbyeol Lee
  • Seok-Ho Hong
  • Heung-Myong Woo
  • Sung-Min Park
  • Sunghun Na
  • Se-Ran Yang
Article

Abstract

Recent studies have reported that stem cells can be isolated from a wide range of tissues including bone marrow, fatty tissue, adipose tissue and placenta. Moreover, several studies also suggest that skin dermis could serve as a source of stem cells, but are of unclear phenotype. Therefore, we isolated and investigated to determine the potential of stem cell within human skin dermis. We isolated cells from human dermis, termed here as human dermis-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hDMSCs) which is able to be isolated by using explants culture method. Our method has an advantage over the enzymatic method as it is easier, less expensive and less cell damage. hDMSCs were maintained in basal culture media and proliferation potential was measured. hDMSCs were highly proliferative and successfully expanded with no additional growth factor. In addition, hDMSCs revealed normal karyotype and expressed high levels of CD90, CD73 and CD105 while did not express the surface markers for CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR. Also, we confirmed that hDMSCs possess the capacity to differentiate into multiple lineage including adipocyte, osteocyte, chondrocyte and precursor of hepatocyte lineage. Considering these results, we suggest that hDMSCs might be a valuable source of stem cells and could potentially be a useful source of clinical application.

Keywords

Human dermis Mesenchymal stem cells Explants culture method Differentiation potential 

Supplementary material

10561_2014_9471_MOESM1_ESM.ppt (599 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PPT 599 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeong-Ran Park
    • 1
    • 4
    • 5
  • Eunjeong Kim
    • 1
    • 4
  • Jungwon Yang
    • 1
    • 4
  • Hanbyeol Lee
    • 1
    • 4
  • Seok-Ho Hong
    • 2
    • 4
  • Heung-Myong Woo
    • 3
    • 4
  • Sung-Min Park
    • 1
    • 4
  • Sunghun Na
    • 6
  • Se-Ran Yang
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, School of MedicineKangwon National UniversityChuncheonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Pulmonary Medicine, School of MedicineKangwon National UniversityChuncheonRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.College of Veterinary MedicineKangwon National UniversityChuncheonRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.School of Medicine, Stem Cell InstituteKangwon National UniversityChuncheonRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Institute of Medical ScienceKangwon National UniversityChuncheonRepublic of Korea
  6. 6.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of MedicineKangwon National UniversityChuncheonRepublic of Korea

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