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Exploring the Moderating Influence of Delinquent Peers on the Link Between Trauma, Anger, and Violence Among Male Youth: Implications for Social Work Practice

Abstract

This study’s objective was to explore the influence of delinquent peer exposure, on the relationship between male youths’ histories of trauma, anger, and violent behavior. Using a nationally representative sample of male adolescents aged 12–17 and self report interviews, information was gathered on their levels of exposure to violence, stressful life events (SLE), anger, depression, delinquent peer exposure, and violent behavior. Results of a moderation analyses revealed that youth who reported higher levels of exposure to trauma, anger, and delinquent peers were at an increased risk for anger and for violent offending. Delinquent peer exposure exerted a significant interaction effect on the relationship between anger and violent offending. The implications for prevention and intervention efforts are delineated.

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Maschi, T., Bradley, C. Exploring the Moderating Influence of Delinquent Peers on the Link Between Trauma, Anger, and Violence Among Male Youth: Implications for Social Work Practice. Child Adolesc Soc Work J 25, 125–138 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10560-008-0116-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10560-008-0116-2

Keywords

  • Trauma
  • Exposure to violence
  • Stressful life events
  • Juvenile delinquency
  • Delinquent peer exposure, Violent offending
  • Moderation analysis