Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 24, Issue 3, pp 285–311 | Cite as

Interventions for Internationally Adopted Children and Families: A Review of the Literature

  • Janet A. Welsh
  • Andres G. Viana
  • Stephen A. Petrill
  • Matthew D. Mathias
Article

Abstract

Internationally adopted (IA) children are at increased risk for health-related, developmental, and behavioral difficulties. This article reviews the literature on various interventions currently used with IA populations; including health-related interventions provided by medical specialists, preparation programs provided by adoption agencies and other social service organizations, treatments for attachment and behavioral disorders, psychoeducational services, programs designed to improve children’s care prior to adoption, and parent-based initiatives. Surprisingly, very little systematic information exists regarding the effectiveness of interventions designed to prevent and remediate these difficulties in IA children. Recommendations for future research activity and for best practice approaches to intervention are discussed.

Keywords

International adoption Intercountry adoption Adoption medicine Attachment interventions Educational interventions 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janet A. Welsh
    • 1
  • Andres G. Viana
    • 2
  • Stephen A. Petrill
    • 3
  • Matthew D. Mathias
    • 4
  1. 1.Prevention Research Center for the Promotion of Human DevelopmentThe Pennsylvania State University, State CollegeUniversity ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Human Development and Family ScienceThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  4. 4.Duke University Affiliated Physicians, Triangle Family PracticeDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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