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Cancer and Metastasis Reviews

, Volume 33, Issue 2–3, pp 555–566 | Cite as

Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC): preclinical and clinical evidence for the sequential use of novel therapeutics

  • Deborah Mukherji
  • Aurelius Omlin
  • Carmel Pezaro
  • Ali Shamseddine
  • Johann de Bono
Article

Abstract

With five novel therapies shown to improve survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in the last 3 years, patients are now living longer and experiencing better quality of life. Since docetaxel became standard of care for men with symptomatic metastatic CRPC, three artificial treatment “spaces” have emerged for prostate cancer drug development: pre-docetaxel, docetaxel combinations, and following docetaxel. Multiple therapies are currently under development in both early and late stage CRPC. Additionally, the novel agents abiraterone, radium-223, cabazitaxel, and enzalutamide have all been approved in the post-docetaxel setting. Strategies for patient selection and treatment sequencing are therefore urgently required. In this comprehensive review, we will summarize the preclinical and clinical data available with regards to sequencing of the novel treatments for CRPC.

Keywords

Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) Androgen receptor signaling Abiraterone acetate Enzalutamide Cabazitaxel Sequential treatment strategies 

Notes

Disclosure

DM, AO, CP, and JS deBono are current or former ICR employees. The ICR has a commercial interest in abiraterone and PI3K and AKT inhibitors. JS de Bono has served as a paid consultant for J&J, Sanofi Aventis, Medivation, Astellas, AstraZeneca, Dendreon, Genentech, Pfizer, and GSK.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah Mukherji
    • 1
  • Aurelius Omlin
    • 2
    • 3
  • Carmel Pezaro
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ali Shamseddine
    • 1
  • Johann de Bono
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/OncologyAmerican University of Beirut Medical CenterBeirutLebanon
  2. 2.Prostate Cancer Targeted Therapy Group and Drug Development UnitThe Royal Marsden NHS Foundation TrustSurreyUK
  3. 3.The Institute of Cancer ResearchSurreyUK

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