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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 29, Issue 7, pp 609–610 | Cite as

Re: Kheifets et al. (2017): Residential magnetic fields exposure and childhood leukemia: a population-based case–control study in California

  • Duncan C. Thomas
Letter to the editor
  • 118 Downloads

In a case–control study of childhood leukemia and residential magnetic fields (MF) in California, Kheifets and colleagues recently reported a weak non-significant association from an exposure evaluation that only included high-voltage transmission lines (HVTL) [1]. However, our 1999 paper [2] reported a significant association in a study of Los Angeles County, California’s largest metropolitan area, with similar methods applied to all types of electric lines near a subject’s residence. By comparing these two studies, the relative merits of the MF exposure assessment methods and risk estimates can be assessed, providing lessons for future epidemiologic studies of residential MF carcinogenicity.

Kheifets et al. obtained 5,788 cases of childhood leukemia and an equal number of controls from the California Cancer Registry. They conducted a detailed MF exposure assessment for the 302 subject’s residences that were close to an HVTL, and treated all other residences as having background MFs [

Notes

Funding

Funding was provided by Electric Power Research Institute (Grant No. 2964) and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (Grant No. P30 ES 07048-11).

Supplementary material

10552_2018_1037_MOESM1_ESM.docx (22 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 21 KB)

References

  1. 1.
    Kheifets L et al (2017) Residential magnetic fields exposure and childhood leukemia: a population-based case–control study in California. Cancer Causes Control 28:1117–1123CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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    Thomas DC, Bowman JD, Jiang L, Jiang F, Peters JM (1999) Residential magnetic fields predicted from wiring configurations II: relationships to childhood leukemia. Bioelectromagnetics 20:414–422CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Vergara XP, Kavet R, Crespi CM, Hooper C, Silva JM, Kheifets L (2015) Estimating magnetic fields of homes near transmission lines in the California power line study. Environ Res 140:514–523CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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    London SJ, Thomas DC, Bowman JD, Sobel E, Cheng TC, Peters JM (1991) Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia. Am J Epidemiol 134:923–937CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Bowman JD, Thomas DC, Jiang L, Jiang F, Peters JM (1999) Residential magnetic fields predicted from wiring configurations I: exposure model. Bioelectromagnetics 20:399–413CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    World Health Organization (2007) Extremely low frequency fields. Environmental health criteria monograph no. 238. http://www.who.int/peh-emf/publications/elf_ehc/en/. Accessed 30 Dec 2017

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Preventive MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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