Coffee and tea consumption and endometrial cancer risk in a population-based study in New Jersey

Abstract

We evaluated the role of tea and coffee and substances added (sugar/honey, creamers, and milk) on endometrial cancer risk in a population-based case–control study in six counties in New Jersey, including 417 cases and 395 controls. Multivariate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using unconditional logistic regression. There was a moderate inverse association with coffee consumption, with an adjusted OR of 0.65 (95% CI: 0.36–1.17) for women who reported more than two cups/day of coffee compared to none. Tea consumption appeared to increase risk (OR: 1.93; 95% CI: 1.08–3.45), but after including the variables sugar/honey and cream/milk added to tea in the model, the risk estimate was attenuated and no longer statistically significant (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 0.96–3.28 for those consuming more than one cup/day of tea compared to nonusers). There was a suggestion of a decreased risk associated with green tea, but the confidence interval included one (adjusted OR for one or more cups/week vs. none: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.48–1.18). We found an association with adding sugar/honey to tea, with those adding two or more teaspoons/cup having an OR of 2.66 (95% CI: 1.42–4.98; p for trend <0.01) after adjusting for relevant confounders. For sugar/honey added to coffee the corresponding OR was 1.43 (95% CI: 0.81–2.55). Our results indicate that sugars and milk/cream added to coffee and tea should be considered in future studies evaluating coffee and tea and endometrial cancer risk.

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Acknowledgments

We thank the interviewers and students who were involved in this study, the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services personnel, as well as all the participants who generously donated their time to the study. Funding: This work was funded by NIH-K07 CA095666 and R01CA83918.

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Correspondence to Elisa V. Bandera.

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Bandera, E.V., Williams-King, M.G., Sima, C. et al. Coffee and tea consumption and endometrial cancer risk in a population-based study in New Jersey. Cancer Causes Control 21, 1467–1473 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9575-9

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Keywords

  • Endometrial cancer
  • Diet
  • Nutrition
  • Coffee
  • Tea
  • Sugar