Case–control study of green tea consumption and the risk of endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the association between green tea consumption and the risk of endometrial cancer restricted to endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EEA) using a case–control design in Japan.

Methods

The cases were 152 patients with histopathologically diagnosed EEA, and the controls were 285 healthy women who were matched for age and area of residence with individual cases. The subjects completed a questionnaire regarding health-related lifestyle and reproductive history, and a food frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) of EEA for frequency of green tea consumption were calculated by conditional logistic regression analysis.

Results

We observed a significant inverse association between green tea consumption and the risk of EEA with a dose–response relationship. The multivariate-adjusted OR of EEA was 0.77 (95% CI: 0.37–1.58) for those in the second quartile of green tea consumption (5–6 cups/week–1 cup/day), 0.61 (0.30–1.23) in the third quartile (2–3 cups/day), and 0.33 (0.15–0.75) in the highest quartile (≥4 cups/day), as referenced with those in the lowest quartile (≤4 cups/week; p for trend = 0.007). This inverse association was consistently observed regardless of the presence or absence of factors such as obesity and menopause.

Conclusion

Green tea consumption may be associated with a lower risk of EEA.

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Acknowledgments

We deeply thank for Dr. Y. Tsubono’s permission to use the FFQ for this study. This study was supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas, a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) and (C), a Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B), a Grant-in-Aid for Exploratory Research, from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Japan; a Grant-in-Aid from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, Japan; the 21st Century COE Program Special Research Grant (Tohoku University) from the Ministry of Education Science, Sports and Culture, Japan; a Grant-in-aid from the Kurokawa Cancer Research Foundation, the Uehara Memorial Foundation, All Japan Coffee Association, and the Third Term Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan. All the authors of this article have directly participated in the planning, execution, or analysis of this study. There are no financial or other relations that could lead to conflict of interest.

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Correspondence to Yukika Kakuta.

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Kakuta, Y., Nakaya, N., Nagase, S. et al. Case–control study of green tea consumption and the risk of endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Cancer Causes Control 20, 617 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-008-9272-0

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Keywords

  • Green tea
  • Endometrial cancer
  • Endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma
  • Japanese